Old City, Jerusalem ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฑ

Old City, Jerusalem ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฑ

This is where cultures come together, (or collide, depending on who you are and how you choose to view things). I personally loved every aspect of the Old City. There’s so many things to see, foods to try, people to meet. This is a mecca of diversified beauty. I walked through all 4 quarters and spoke to people in each of them. Granted, I happened upon some streets purely by accident, but in a way I’m happy I did.

The Muslim Quarter was full of fragrance and color and sugary treats. The streets were remarkably tight-nit and somewhat confusing; I lost my way several times. I saw Russian tourists buying very touristy t-shirts, which made me laugh, because no matter where you go in the world, someone somewhere will try and sell you useless junk. In this case, it was a “Guns N Moses” t-shirt, but my statement remains true.

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The Armenian and Christian Quarters were the quietest, save for a couple of tour guides leading a group of very captivated members. The glorious architecture, stone walkways, and pin-drop silence overwhelmed me with an otherworldly sensation. I hope to visit other old cities around the world to learn more about their cultures and surrounding histories.

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And finally, we’ve arrived in the Jewish Quarter. I finished my self-led tour with a stroll through The Cardo, (a super fun thing to do when everyone’s cleaning for Pesach). My biggest regret is not taking more photos. I know I say that a lot on this blog, but here I strongly mean it. Though I’m not too concerned. Something tells me I’ll be back soon enough.

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Churva Shul

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